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Car tips & advice | 23.12.2013 - 07:52

Be Prepared: What all Canadian Drivers Should Have in their Vehicle Emergency Kit

There are many things in life that are unpredictable and breaking down in your vehicle is one of them, but you can make sure you are at least well prepared if and when disaster strikes by having all the right items in your vehicle to deal with an emergency breakdown situation.

If we could predict when or where we are going to break down then planning for that event would be a whole lot easier.

 

There are many things in life that are unpredictable and breaking down in your vehicle is one of them, but you can make sure you are at least well prepared if and when disaster strikes by having all the right items in your vehicle to deal with an emergency breakdown situation.

 

Here is look at what all drivers on Canadian roads should be carrying with them every time they get behind the wheel.

 

Further, if you’re interested in learning how break downs and collisions may affect your auto insurance rates, brokers like BrokerLink may be able to help answer those questions.

 

What You Should Carry

 

Having the right tools and accessories to deal with a roadside breakdown or incident will help ensure that an unfortunate event in your day does not turn into any more of a disaster than it has to be.

 

Here is list of some of the items that you should consider including in your emergency kit:

 

  • a basic first aid kit
  • tire repair kit and foot or electric pump
  • basic tool kit
  • warning triangle or cones & possibly some emergency road flares
  • a pair of work gloves that are preferably insulated
  • fire extinguisher
  • small supply of non-perishable food
  • flashlight
  • some bottled water
  • booster cables for your battery
  • a thermal blankets in case you have to stay out of the vehicle on the roadside

 

Many of these items may come in a ready-made emergency kit which you can store in the trunk and whatever you add to the list and decide to pack away, make sure that the items are stored securely.

 

You might want to consider putting items like blankets in a backpack, giving you convenient storage in the car and providing you with a handy carrier if you need to walk for help and want to take some supplies with you.

 

Is a food supply necessary?

 

A first-aid kit or booster cables might be considered more essential items in an emergency pack but you never know when or where you are going to break down and you could be several hours from getting help or supplies.

 

It makes sense to carry some non-perishable items that can provide an energy boost, foods such as nuts, dried fruit and beef jerky pack a lot of calories and they can give you an energy boost, which can help you concentrate on the task ahead or be a real life-saver if you have to maintain a good blood-sugar level for a medical condition like diabetes.

 

Lighting

 

If you pack a flashlight in your emergency kit, you might want to consider one that doesn’t rely on batteries to work. It would be exasperating to have packed a light only to find out that the batteries are dead and the flashlight is then of no use to you at all.

 

There are several flashlights available that work without needing batteries and can be charged up in an instant when you need them. They may be slightly more expensive but you will consider it a fair investment if your flashlight gives you the light you need at a time when you need it most.

 

Adequate protection

 

It always makes sound sense to consider the area that you are travelling through and the surroundings, so that if you do experience an emergency breakdown, you have adequate protection.

 

If your travel plans mean you might potentially get stuck in the wilderness, it would make sense to carry sufficient clothing which is both reflective and has thermal qualities, whilst emergency flares and maybe a gun to protect you from wild animals would also be considered sound contingency planning in the event of an emergency.

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